Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author: Martin Schlumberger x
  • Open access x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access

Marcia S Brose, Johannes Smit, Chia-Chi Lin, Fabian Pitoia, Marc Fellous, Yoriko DeSanctis, Martin Schlumberger, Masayuki Tori and Iwao Sugitani

There are limited treatment options for patients with radioactive iodine refractory, progressive differentiated thyroid cancer. Although there is consensus that multikinase inhibitor therapy should be considered in patients with progressive disease with considerable tumor load or symptomatic disease, uncertainty exists on the optimal timing to treat with a multikinase inhibitor, especially for asymptomatic patients. RIFTOS MKI is an international, prospective, open-label, multicenter, noninterventional study with the primary objective to compare the time to symptomatic progression from study entry in asymptomatic patients with radioactive iodine refractory, progressive differentiated thyroid cancer for whom there is a decision to initiate multikinase inhibitors at study entry (cohort 1) with those for whom there is a decision to not initiate multikinase inhibitors at study entry (cohort 2). Secondary endpoints are overall survival and progression-free survival, which will be compared between cohorts 1 and 2. Additional secondary endpoints are postprogression survival from time of symptomatic progression, duration of and response to each systemic treatment regimen and dosing of sorafenib throughout the treatment period. Asymptomatic, multikinase inhibitor-naive patients aged ≥18 years with histologically/cytologically documented differentiated thyroid cancer that is radioactive iodine refractory are eligible. Patients may receive any therapy for differentiated thyroid cancer, including sorafenib or other multikinase inhibitors if indicated and decided on by the treating physician. In total, 700 patients are estimated to be enrolled from >20 countries. Final analysis will be performed once the last enrolled patient has been followed up with for 24 months (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: Nbib2303444).

Open access

Catherine Ory, Nicolas Ugolin, Céline Levalois, Ludovic Lacroix, Bernard Caillou, Jean-Michel Bidart, Martin Schlumberger, Ibrahima Diallo, Florent de Vathaire, Paul Hofman, José Santini, Bernard Malfoy and Sylvie Chevillard

Both external and internal exposure to ionizing radiation are strong risk factors for the development of thyroid tumors. Until now, the diagnosis of radiation-induced thyroid tumors has been deduced from a network of arguments taken together with the individual history of radiation exposure. Neither the histological features nor the genetic alterations observed in these tumors have been shown to be specific fingerprints of an exposure to radiation. The aim of our work is to define ionizing radiation-related molecular specificities in a series of secondary thyroid tumors developed in the radiation field of patients treated by radiotherapy. To identify molecular markers that could represent a radiation-induction signature, we compared 25K microarray transcriptome profiles of a learning set of 28 thyroid tumors, which comprised 14 follicular thyroid adenomas (FTA) and 14 papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC), either sporadic or consecutive to external radiotherapy in childhood. We identified a signature composed of 322 genes which discriminates radiation-induced tumors (FTA and PTC) from their sporadic counterparts. The robustness of this signature was further confirmed by blind case-by-case classification of an independent set of 29 tumors (16 FTA and 13 PTC). After the histology code break by the clinicians, 26/29 tumors were well classified regarding tumor etiology, 1 was undetermined, and 2 were misclassified. Our results help shed light on radiation-induced thyroid carcinogenesis, since specific molecular pathways are deregulated in radiation-induced tumors.

Open access

Francis Worden, Martin Fassnacht, Yuankai Shi, Tatiana Hadjieva, Françoise Bonichon, Ming Gao, Laura Fugazzola, Yuichi Ando, Yasuhisa Hasegawa, Do Joon Park, Young Kee Shong, Johannes W A Smit, John Chung, Christian Kappeler, Gerold Meinhardt, Martin Schlumberger and Marcia S Brose

Effective adverse event (AE) management is critical to maintaining patients on anticancer therapies. The DECISION trial was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, Phase 3 trial which investigated sorafenib for treatment of progressive, advanced, or metastatic radioactive iodine-refractory, differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Four hundred and seventeen adult patients were randomized (1:1) to receive oral sorafenib (400 mg, twice daily) or placebo, until progression, unacceptable toxicity, noncompliance, or withdrawal. Progression-free survival, the primary endpoint of DECISION, was reported previously. To elucidate the patterns and management of AEs in sorafenib-treated patients in the DECISION trial, this report describes detailed, by-treatment-cycle analyses of the incidence, prevalence, and severity of hand–foot skin reaction (HFSR), rash/desquamation, hypertension, diarrhea, fatigue, weight loss, increased serum thyroid stimulating hormone, and hypocalcemia, as well as the interventions used to manage these AEs. By-cycle incidence of the above-selected AEs with sorafenib was generally highest in cycle 1 or 2 then decreased. AE prevalence generally increased over cycles 2–6 then stabilized or declined. Among these AEs, only weight loss tended to increase in severity (from grade 1 to 2) over time; severity of HFSR and rash/desquamation declined over time. AEs were mostly grade 1 or 2, and were generally managed with dose interruptions/reductions, and concomitant medications (e.g. antidiarrheals, antihypertensives, dermatologic preparations). Most dose interruptions/reductions occurred in early cycles. In conclusion, AEs with sorafenib in DECISION were typically grade 1 or 2, occurred early during the treatment course, and were manageable over time.