Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author: Marina Nikiforova x
  • All content x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Jessica L Geiger, Simion I Chiosea, Sue M Challinor, Marina N Nikiforova, and Julie E Bauman

Free access

Arivarasan Karunamurthy, Federica Panebianco, Susan J Hsiao, Jennie Vorhauer, Marina N Nikiforova, Simion Chiosea, and Yuri E Nikiforov

Abstract

The EIF1AX gene mutations have been recently found in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC). The prevalence of these mutations in other types of thyroid cancers and benign nodules is unknown. In this study, we analyzed the occurrence of EIF1AX mutations in exons 2, 5, and 6 of the gene in a series of 266 thyroid tumors and hyperplastic nodules by either Sanger or next-generation sequencing (ThyroSeq v.2). In addition, 647 thyroid fine-needle aspiration (FNA) samples with indeterminate cytology were analyzed. Using surgically removed samples, EIF1AX mutations were detected in 3/86 (2.3%) PTC, 1/4 (25%) ATC, 0/53 follicular carcinomas, 0/12 medullary carcinomas, 2/27 (7.4%) follicular adenomas, and 1/80 (1.3%) hyperplastic nodules. Among five mutation-positive FNA samples with surgical follow-up, one nodule was PTC and others were benign follicular adenomas or hyperplastic nodules. Overall, among 33 mutations identified, A113_splice mutation at the intron 5/exon 6 splice site of EIF1AX was the most common. All four carcinomas harbored A113_splice mutation and three of them had one or more coexisting mutations, typically RAS. All PTC carrying EIF1AX mutations were encapsulated follicular variants. In summary, this study shows that EIF1AX mutations occur not only in thyroid carcinomas, but also in benign nodules. The most common mutation hotspot is the A113_splice, followed by a cluster of mutations in exon 2. When found in thyroid FNA samples, EIF1AX mutations confer ~20% risk of cancer; the risk is likely to be higher in nodules carrying a A113_splice mutation and when EIF1AX coexists with RAS mutations.

Free access

Federica Panebianco, Alyaksandr V Nikitski, Marina N Nikiforova, Cihan Kaya, Linwah Yip, Vincenzo Condello, Abigail I Wald, Yuri E Nikiforov, and Simion I Chiosea

ALK fusions are found in various tumors, including thyroid cancer, and serve as a diagnostic marker and therapeutic target. Spectrum and outcomes of ALK fusions found in thyroid nodules and cancer are not fully characterized. We report a series of 44 ALK-translocated thyroid neoplasms, including 31 identified preoperatively in thyroid fine-needle aspirates (FNA). The average patients’ age was 43 years (range, 8–76 years); only one with radiation history. All 19 resected thyroid nodules with ALK fusion identified preoperatively were malignant. Among nodules with known surgical pathology (n = 32), 84% were papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs) and 16% poorly differentiated thyroid carcinomas (PDTCs). PTCs showed infiltrative growth with follicular architecture seen exclusively (30%) or in combination with papillary and/or solid growth (37%). Tumor multifocality was seen in 10 (31%) PTC cases. Most PDTC had a well-differentiated PTC component. Lymph node metastases were identified in 10/18 (56%) patients with neck dissection. The most common ALK fusion partners were STRN (n = 22) and EML4 (n = 17). In five cases, novel ALK fusion partners were discovered. All five PDTCs carried STRN-ALK fusion. On follow-up, ten patients were free of disease at 2–108 months, whereas two patients with PDTC died of disease. In summary, ALK fusion-positive thyroid carcinomas are typically infiltrative PTC with common follicular growth, which may show tumor dedifferentiation associated with increased mortality. Compared to EML4-ALK, STRN-ALK may be more common in PDTC, and ~10% of ALK fusions occur to rare gene partners. When ALK fusion is detected preoperatively in FNA samples, malignancy should be expected.

Restricted access

William R Doerfler, Alyaksandr V Nikitski, Elena M Morariu, N Paul Ohori, Simion I Chiosea, Michael S Landau, Marina N Nikiforova, Yuri E Nikiforov, Linwah Yip, and Pooja Manroa

Hürthle cell carcinoma (HCC) is a distinct type of thyroid cancer genetically characterized by DNA copy number alterations (CNA), typically of genome haploidization type (GH-type). However, whether CNA also occurs in benign Hürthle cell adenomas (HCA) or Hürthle cell hyperplastic nodules (HCHN), and have diagnostic impact in fine-needle aspiration (FNA) samples, remains unknown. To address these questions, we (1) analyzed 26 HCC, 24 HCA, and 8 HCHN tissues for CNA and other mutations using ThyroSeq v3 (TSv3) next-generation sequencing panel, and (2) determined cancer rate in 111 FNA samples with CNA and known surgical outcome. We identified CNA, more often of the GH-type, in 81% of HCC and in 38% HCA, but not in HCHN. Among four HCC with distant metastasis, all had CNA and three TERT mutations. Overall, positive TSv3 results were obtained in 24 (92%) HCC, including all with ATA high risk of recurrence or metastasis. Among 111 FNA cases with CNA, 38 (34%) were malignant and 73 (66%) benign. A significant correlation between cancer rate and nodule size was observed, particularly among cases with GH-type CNA, where every additional centimeter of nodule size increased the malignancy odds by 1.9 (95% CI 1.3–2.7; P = 0.001). In summary, the results of this study demonstrate that CNA characteristic of HCC also occur in HCA, although with lower frequency, and probability of cancer in nodules with CNA increases with nodule size. Detection of CNA, in conjunction with other mutations and nodule size, is helpful in predicting malignancy in thyroid nodules.