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  • Author: Charalampos Lyssikatos x
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Evgenia Gourgari, Maya Lodish, Meg Keil, Robert Wesley, Suvimol Hill, Paraskevi Xekouki, Charalampos Lyssikatos, Elena Belyavskaya, Sierra Maria De La Luz and Constantine A Stratakis

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Paraskevi Xekouki, Spyridon A Mastroyiannis, Dimitrios Avgeropoulos, Maria de la Luz Sierra, Giampaolo Trivellin, Evgenia A Gourgari, Charalampos Lyssikatos, Martha Quezado, Nicholas Patronas, Christina Kanaka-Gantenbein, George P Chrousos and Constantine A Stratakis

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W Patricia Bandettini, Alexander S Karageorgiadis, Ninet Sinaii, Douglas R Rosing, Vandana Sachdev, Marie Helene Schernthaner-Reiter, Evgenia Gourgari, Georgios Z Papadakis, Meg F Keil, Charalampos Lyssikatos, J Aidan Carney, Andrew E Arai, Maya Lodish and Constantine A Stratakis

Carney complex (CNC) is a multiple neoplasia syndrome that is caused mostly by PRKAR1A mutations. Cardiac myxomas are the leading cause of mortality in CNC patients who, in addition, often develop growth hormone (GH) excess. We studied patients with CNC, who were observed for over a period of 20 years (1995–2015) for the development of both GH excess and cardiac myxomas. GH secretion was evaluated by standard testing; dedicated cardiovascular imaging was used to detect cardiac abnormalities. Four excised cardiac myxomas were tested for the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). A total of 99 CNC patients (97 with a PRKAR1A mutation) were included in the study with a mean age of 25.8 ± 16.6 years at presentation. Over an observed mean follow-up of 25.8 years, 60% of patients with GH excess (n = 46) developed a cardiac myxoma compared with only 36% of those without GH excess (n = 54) (P = 0.016). Overall, patients with GH excess were also more likely to have a tumor vs those with normal GH secretion (OR: 2.78, 95% CI: 1.23–6.29; P = 0.014). IGF-1 mRNA and protein were higher in CNC myxomas than in normal heart tissue. We conclude that the development of cardiac myxomas in CNC may be associated with increased GH secretion, in a manner analogous to the association between fibrous dysplasia and GH excess in McCune–Albright syndrome, a condition similar to CNC. We speculate that treatment of GH excess in patients with CNC may reduce the likelihood of cardiac myxoma formation and/or recurrence of this tumor.

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Amit Tirosh, Ahmed Hamimi, Fabio Faucz, Genya Aharon-Hananel, Phaedon D Zavras, Belen Bonella, Adi Auerbach, David Gillis, Charalampos Lyssikatos, Elena Belyavskaya, Constantine A Stratakis and Ahmed M Gharib

This study aimed to evaluate liver involvement in patients with Carney complex (CNC) based on a large cohort and to analyze any germline PRKAR1A genotype–phenotype association of liver disease. The study included 83 patients with CNC, followed between 1995 and 2018 at a tertiary research center. We reviewed liver images, recorded types and number of lesions and analyzed per genotype: all patients were sequenced for the PRKAR1A gene. A total of 29/83 patients (24.0%) had liver radiological findings. Patients with liver lesion had a significantly higher rate of pathogenic variants detected in the PRKAR1A gene (72.4 vs 38.9%, P = 0.005, respectively). Patients with a pathogenic variant detected on germline PRKAR1A analysis had a higher risk for having a liver lesion compared with patients with wild-type (WT) PRKAR1A alleles (21/42 (50.0%) vs 8/41 (19.5%), respectively, P = 0.004). Among patients with liver lesions, those with a nonsense PRKAR1A pathogenic-variant had more liver lesions (7/7) than among those with other pathogenic-variant types (8/22, P = 0.001). In multivariable analysis, detection of liver lesion(s) was associated with an odds ratio of 5.2 for cardiac myxomas (95% CI 1.55–17.49, P = 0.008). In conclusion, patients with CNC, particularly with a PRKAR1A pathogenic variant, have a higher rate of liver lesions. Additionally, liver lesions are associated with a high risk for cardiac myxomas in this population.