Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 9 of 9 items for

  • Author: Electron Kebebew x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Lisa Zhang, Reza Rahbari, Mei He and Electron Kebebew

Cancer gender disparities have been observed for a variety of human malignancies. Thyroid cancer is one such example where there is a dramatic difference in the incidence, aggressiveness, and death rate by gender. The molecular basis for gender disparity is poorly understood. To address this, we performed genome-wide gene expression profiling in matched papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) samples and identified nine candidate genes differentially expressed by gender. One of these genes was CDC23 that was upregulated in PTC in men compared with women. Because the function and expression of CDC23 is unknown in eukaryotic cells, we further characterized the expression of CDC23 in normal, hyperplastic, and PTC tissue samples. We found CDC23 was overexpressed in PTC and absent in normal and hyperplastic thyroid tissue. In thyroid cancer cells, functional knockdown of CDC23 resulted in an increase in the number of cells in both the S and G2M phases of the cell cycle, and an inhibition of cellular proliferation, tumor spheroid formation, and anchorage-independent growth. Cellular arrest in both S and G2M phases was associated with significant cyclin B1 and securin protein accumulation after CDC23 knockdown. Moreover, the effect of CDC23 on cellular proliferation and cell cycle progression was reversed on triple knockdown studies of CDC23, cyclin B1, and securin. Our data taken together suggests CDC23 has important biologic effects on cell proliferation and cell cycle progression. The effect of CDC23 on cellular proliferation and cell cycle progression is mediated, at least in part, by cyclin B1 and securin protein levels. Therefore, we propose that CDC23 is a critical regulator of cell cycle and cell growth, and may be involved in thyroid cancer initiation and progression, and may explain the different tumor biology observed by gender.

Free access

Meenu Jain, Lisa Zhang, Mei He, Ya-Qin Zhang, Min Shen and Electron Kebebew

Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare but aggressive malignancy with no effective therapy for patients with unresectable disease. The aim of the current study was i) to evaluate TOP2A expression and function in human adrenocortical neoplasm and ACC cells and ii) to determine the anticancer activity of agents that target TOP2A. TOP2A mRNA and protein expression levels were evaluated in 112 adrenocortical tissue samples (21 normal adrenal cortex, 80 benign adrenocortical tumors, and 11 ACCs). In vitro siRNA knockdown of TOP2A in ACC cell lines (NCI-H295R and SW13) was used to determine its effect on cellular proliferation, cell cycle, anchorage-independent growth, and cellular invasion. We screened 14 TOP2A inhibitors for their anticancer activity in ACC cells. TOP2A mRNA and protein expression was significantly higher in ACC than in benign and normal adrenocortical tissue samples (P<0.05). Knockdown of TOP2A gene expression in ACC cell lines significantly decreased cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, and invasion (P<0.05). A screening assay in NCI-H295R cells showed that 11 of 14 TOP2A inhibitors had antiproliferative activity, 5 of the 14 TOP2A inhibitors had a higher antiproliferative activity than mitotane, and aclarubicin was the agent with the highest activity. Aclarubicin was validated to significantly decrease proliferation and tumor spheroid size in both NCI-H295R and SW13 ACC cell lines (P<0.05). Our results suggest that TOP2A is overexpressed in ACC, regulates cellular proliferation and invasion in ACC cells, and is an attractive target for ACC therapy. Of the TOP2A inhibitors screened, aclarubicin is a good candidate agent to test in future clinical trials for patients with locally advanced and metastatic ACC.

Free access

Amit Mehta, Lisa Zhang, Myriem Boufraqech, Yaqin Zhang, Dhaval Patel, Min Shen and Electron Kebebew

Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human malignancies. Currently, there is no standard or effective therapy for ATC. Drug repurposing for cancer treatment is an emerging approach for identifying compounds that may have antineoplastic effects. The aim of this study was to use high-throughput drug library screening to identify and subsequently validate novel therapeutic agents with anticancer effects in ATC. We performed quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) in ATC cell lines (SW-1736, 8505C, and C-643), using a compound library of 3282 drugs. qHTS identified 100 compounds that were active in all three ATC cell lines. Proteasome inhibitors were one of the most active drug categories according to enrichment analysis. Of the three proteasome inhibitors screened, a second-generation proteasome inhibitor, carfilzomib, was the most active. Treatment of ATC cells with carfilzomib significantly inhibited cellular proliferation and induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Mechanistically, carfilzomib increased expression of p27 (CDKN1B) and decreased expression of the anti-apoptotic protein ATF4. Pretreatment with carfilzomib reduced in vivo metastases (lung, bone, liver, and kidney) and disease progression, and decreased N-cadherin expression. Carfilzomib treatment of mice with established, widely metastatic disease significantly increased their survival, without significant toxicity. Our findings support the use or clinical study of carfilzomib as a therapeutic option in patients with advanced and metastatic ATC.

Free access

Arthur Varoquaux, Electron Kebebew, Fréderic Sebag, Katherine Wolf, Jean-François Henry, Karel Pacak and David Taïeb

The vagus nerve (cranial nerve X) is the main nerve of the parasympathetic division of the autonomic nervous system. Vagal paragangliomas (VPGLs) are a prime example of an endocrine tumor associated with the vagus nerve. This rare, neural crest tumor constitutes the second most common site of hereditary head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGLs), most often in relation to mutations in the succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit D (SDHD) gene. The treatment paradigm for VPGL has progressively shifted from surgery to abstention or therapeutic radiation with curative-like outcomes. Parathyroid tissue and parathyroid adenoma can also be found in close association with the vagus nerve in intra or paravagal situations. Vagal parathyroid adenoma can be identified with preoperative imaging or suspected intraoperatively by experienced surgeons. Vagal parathyroid adenomas located in the neck or superior mediastinum can be removed via initial cervicotomy, while those located in the aortopulmonary window require a thoracic approach. This review particularly emphasizes the embryology, molecular genetics, and modern imaging of these tumors.

Restricted access

Douglas Wiseman, James D McDonald, Dhaval Patel, Electron Kebebew, Karel Pacak and Naris Nilubol

Postoperative hypotension frequently occurs after resection of pheochromocytoma and/or paraganglioma (PPGLs). Epidural anesthesia (EA) is often used for pain control in open resection of these tumors; one of its side effects is hypotension. Our aim is to determine if EA is associated with an increased risk of postoperative hypotension after open resection of PPGLs. We conducted a retrospective review of patients who underwent open resection of PPGLs at the National Institutes of Health from 2004 to 2019. Clinical and perioperative parameters were analyzed by the use of EA. The primary endpoint was postoperative hypotension. Ninety-seven patients (46 female and 51 male; mean age, 38.5 years) underwent open resection of PPGLs and 69 (71.1%) received EA. Patients with EA had a higher rate beta-blocker use (79.7% vs 57.1%, P = 0.041), metastasis (69.6% vs 39.3%, P = 0.011), and were more frequently hypotensive after surgery (58.8% vs 25.0%, P = 0.003) compared to those without EA. Patients with postoperative hypotension had higher plasma normetanephrines than those without (7.3 fold vs 4.1 fold above the upper limit of normal, P = 0.018). Independent factors associated with postoperative hypotension include the use of beta-blockers (HR = 3.35 (95% CI: 1.16–9.67), P = 0.026) and EA (HR = 3.49 (95% CI: 1.25–9.76), P = 0.017). Data from this retrospective study suggest that, in patients with open resection of PPGLs, EA is an independent risk factor for early postoperative hypotension. Special caution is required in patients on beta-blockade. A prospective evaluation with standardized protocols for the use of EA and management of hemodynamic variability is necessary.

Free access

Vaishali I Parekh, Sita D Modali, James Welch, William F Simonds, Lee S Weinstein, Electron Kebebew and Sunita K Agarwal

Free access

Myriem Boufraqech, Lisa Zhang, Meenu Jain, Dhaval Patel, Ryan Ellis, Yin Xiong, Mei He, Naris Nilubol, Maria J Merino and Electron Kebebew

The expression and function of miR-145 in thyroid cancer is unknown. We evaluated the expression and function of miR-145 in thyroid cancer and its potential clinical application as a biomarker. We found that the expression of miR-145 is significantly downregulated in thyroid cancer as compared with normal. Overexpression of miR-145 in thyroid cancer cell lines resulted in: decreased cell proliferation, migration, invasion, VEGF secretion, and E-cadherin expression. miR-145 overexpression also inhibited the PI3K/Akt pathway and directly targeted AKT3. In vivo, miR-145 overexpression decreased tumor growth and metastasis in a xenograft mouse model, and VEGF secretion. miR-145 inhibition in normal primary follicular thyroid cells decreased the expression of thyroid cell differentiation markers. Analysis of indeterminate fine-needle aspiration samples showed miR-145 had a 92% negative predictive value for distinguishing benign from malignant thyroid nodules. Circulating miR-145 levels were significantly higher in patients with thyroid cancer and showed a venous gradient. Serum exosome extractions revealed that miR-145 is secreted. Our findings suggest that miR-145 is a master regulator of thyroid cancer growth, mediates its effect through the PI3K/Akt pathway, is secreted by the thyroid cancer cells, and may serve as an adjunct biomarker for thyroid cancer diagnosis.

Free access

Goswin Y Meyer-Rochow, Nicole E Jackson, John V Conaglen, Denis E Whittle, Muthusamy Kunnimalaiyaan, Herbert Chen, Gunnar Westin, Johanna Sandgren, Peter Stålberg, Elham Khanafshar, Daniel Shibru, Quan-Yang Duh, Orlo H Clark, Electron Kebebew, Anthony J Gill, Rory Clifton-Bligh, Bruce G Robinson, Diana E Benn and Stan B Sidhu

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs (∼22 bp) that post-transcriptionally regulate protein expression and are found to be differentially expressed in a number of human cancers. There is increasing evidence to suggest that miRNAs could be useful in cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy. We performed miRNA microarray expression profiling on a cohort of 12 benign and 12 malignant pheochromocytomas and identified a number of differentially expressed miRNAs. These results were validated in a separate cohort of ten benign and ten malignant samples using real-time quantitative RT-PCR; benign samples had a minimum follow-up of at least 2 years. It was found that IGF2 as well as its intronic miR-483-5p was over-expressed, while miR-15a and miR-16 were under-expressed in malignant tumours compared with benign tumours. These miRNAs were found to be diagnostic and prognostic markers for malignant pheochromocytoma. The functional role of miR-15a and miR-16 was investigated in vitro in the rat PC12 pheochromocytoma cell line, and these miRNAs were found to regulate cell proliferation via their effect on cyclin D1 and apoptosis. These data indicate that miRNAs play a pivotal role in the biology of malignant pheochromocytoma, and represent an important class of diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets warranting further investigation.

Free access

Roland Därr, Joan Nambuba, Jaydira Del Rivero, Ingo Janssen, Maria Merino, Milena Todorovic, Bela Balint, Ivana Jochmanova, Josef T Prchal, Ronald M Lechan, Arthur S Tischler, Vera Popovic, Dragana Miljic, Karen T Adams, F Ryan Prall, Alexander Ling, Meredith R Golomb, Michael Ferguson, Naris Nilubol, Clara C Chen, Emily Chew, David Taïeb, Constantine A Stratakis, Tito Fojo, Chunzhang Yang, Electron Kebebew, Zhengping Zhuang and Karel Pacak

Worldwide, the syndromes of paraganglioma (PGL), somatostatinoma (SOM) and early childhood polycythemia are described in only a few patients with somatic mutations in the hypoxia-inducible factor 2 alpha (HIF2A). This study provides detailed information about the clinical aspects and course of 7 patients with this syndrome and brings into perspective these experiences with the pertinent literature. Six females and one male presented at a median age of 28 years (range 11–46). Two were found to have HIF2A somatic mosaicism. No relatives were affected. All patients were diagnosed with polycythemia before age 8 and before PGL/SOM developed. PGLs were found at a median age of 17 years (range 8–38) and SOMs at 29 years (range 22–38). PGLs were multiple, recurrent and metastatic in 100, 100 and 29% of all cases, and SOMs in 40, 40 and 60%, respectively. All PGLs were primarily norepinephrine-producing. All patients had abnormal ophthalmologic findings and those with SOMs had gallbladder disease. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging revealed cystic lesions at multiple sites and hemangiomas in 4 patients (57%), previously thought to be pathognomonic for von Hippel–Lindau disease. The most accurate radiopharmaceutical to detect PGL appeared to be [18F]-fluorodihydroxyphenylalanine ([18F]-FDOPA). Therefore, [18F]-FDOPA PET/CT, not [68Ga]-(DOTA)-[Tyr3]-octreotate ([68Ga]-DOTATATE) PET/CT is recommended for tumor localization and aftercare in this syndrome. The long-term prognosis of the syndrome is unknown. However, to date no deaths occurred after 6 years follow-up. Physicians should be aware of this unique syndrome and its diagnostic and therapeutic challenges.