Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 1 of 1 items for

  • Author: Ritika Kundra x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All Modify Search
Darren Cowzer Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA

Search for other papers by Darren Cowzer in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Ronak H Shah Kravis Center for Molecular Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA

Search for other papers by Ronak H Shah in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Joanne F Chou Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA

Search for other papers by Joanne F Chou in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Ritika Kundra Kravis Center for Molecular Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA

Search for other papers by Ritika Kundra in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Sippy Punn Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA

Search for other papers by Sippy Punn in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Laura Fiedler Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA

Search for other papers by Laura Fiedler in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
April DeMore Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA

Search for other papers by April DeMore in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Marinela Capanu Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA

Search for other papers by Marinela Capanu in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Michael F Berger Kravis Center for Molecular Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA
Department of Pathology and laboratory medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA

Search for other papers by Michael F Berger in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Diane Reidy-Lagunes Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA
Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York, USA

Search for other papers by Diane Reidy-Lagunes in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Nitya Raj Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA
Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York, USA

Search for other papers by Nitya Raj in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

In advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PanNEN), there are little data detailing the frequency of genetic alterations identified in cell free DNA (cfDNA), plasma–tissue concordance of detected alterations, and clinical utility of cfDNA. Patients with metastatic PanNENs underwent cfDNA collection in routine practice. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) of cfDNA and matched tissue when available was performed. Clinical actionability of variants was annotated by OncoKB. Thirty-two cfDNA samples were analyzed from 25 patients, the majority who had well-differentiated intermediate grade disease (13/25; 52%). Genomic alterations were detected in 68% of patients and in 66% of all cfDNA samples. The most frequently altered genes were DAXX (28%), TSC2 (24%), MEN1 (24%), ARID1B (20%), ARID1A (12%), and ATRX (12%). Twenty-three out of 25 (92%) patients underwent tumor tissue NGS. Tissue–plasma concordance for select genes was as follows:DAXX (95.7%), ARID1A (91.1%), ATRX (87%), TSC2 (82.6%), MEN1 (69.6%). Potentially actionable alterations were identified in cfDNA of 8 patients, including TSC2 (4; level 3b), ATM (1; level 3b), ARID1A (2; level 4), and KRAS (1; level 4). An ETV6:NTRK fusion detected in tumor tissue was treated with larotrectinib; at progression, sequencing of cfDNA identified an NTRK3 G623R alteration as the acquired mechanism of resistance; the patient enrolled in a clinical trial of a second-generation TRK inhibitor with clinical benefit. In metastatic PanNENs, cfDNA-based NGS identified tumor-associated mutations in 66% of plasma samples with a high level of plasma-tissue agreement in PanNEN-associated genes. Clonal evolution, actionable alterations, and resistance mechanisms were detected through circulating cfDNA genotyping.

Restricted access