A xenograft and cell line model of SDH-deficient pheochromocytoma derived from Sdhb+/− rats

in Endocrine-Related Cancer
Authors:
James F PowersDepartment of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

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Brent CochranDepartment of Developmental, Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

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James D BalejaDepartment of Developmental, Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

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Hadley D SikesDepartment of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

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Andrew D PattisonDepartment of Clinical Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

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Xue ZhangDepartment of Developmental, Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

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Inna LomakinDepartment of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

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Annette Shepard-BarryDepartment of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

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Karel PacakSection on Medical Neuroendocrinology, Eunice Kennedy Shriver Division National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, Maryland, USA

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Sun Jin MoonDepartment of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

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Troy F LangfordDepartment of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

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Kassi Taylor SteinDepartment of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

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https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1033-2899
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Richard W TothillDepartment of Clinical Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

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Yingbin OuyangCyagen US Inc, Santa Clara, California, USA

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Arthur S TischlerDepartment of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

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Correspondence should be addressed to J F Powers: jpowers1@tuftsmedicalcenter.org
Free access

The authors and journal apologise for an error in the above paper, which appeared in volume 27 part 6, pages 337–354. The error relates to the artwork of Table 1 on page 346, in which the units were given in micromoles per milligram of tissue, when the units should have been given in nanomoles per milligram of tissue.

The correct Table 1 is given in full below:

Table 1

NMR metabolomic profiles of RS0, RS1/2 xenografts and rat adrenal medulla (RAM).

RS0 (n = 4) RS1/2 (n = 3)


RAM (20 pooled)
Mean ± s.e.m. Mean ± s.e.m.
The 10 most abundant detectable metabolites (nmol/mg of tissue)
 Epinephrine 16.15 Lactate 15.18 ± 3.66 Norepinephrine 33.87 ± 29.41
 Norepinephrine 12.33 Taurine 12.11 ± 2.69 Lactate 11.45 ± 2.18
 Glucose 2.31 Succinate 5.99 ± 1.19 Taurine 10.38 ± 0.83
 Lactate 0.89 Glycine 3.47 ± 0.75 Ascorbate 7.611 ± .42
 Taurine 0.61 Glutamate 2.57 ± 0.58 myo-Inositol 6.33 ± 2.80
 ATP (or ADP) 0.59 Ascorbate 2.57 ± 0.64 Glutamate 4.16 ± 0.97
 Ascorbate 0.44 Alanine 2.08 ± 0.45 Dopamine 2.55 ± 2.04
 AMP 0.30 Creatine 1.39 ± 0.28 O-Phosphoethanolamine 2.06 ± 0.25
 ADP (or ATP) 0.21 sn-Glycero-3-phosphocholine 1.29 ± 0.34 AMP 1.85 ± 1.39
 Glutamate 0.17 myo-Inositol 1.21 ± 0.26 Betaine 1.83 ± 0.31
Succinate Succinate
 30 of 67 0.01 30 of 67 0.29 ± 0.10
Catecholamine and metabolite profile (nmol/mg of tissue)
 Dopamine 0.07 0.38 ± 0.08 2.55 ± 2.04
 3,4-Dihydroxybenzeneacetatea 0.00 0.05 ± 0.02 0.23 ± 0.05
 Norepinephrine 12.33 0.06 ± 0.03 33.87 ± 29.41
 Normetanephrine 0.00 0.02 ± 0.01 0.00 ± 0.00
 Epinephrine 16.15 0.00 ± 0.00 0.81 ± 0.78
 Tyrosine 0.00 0.11 ± 0.01 0.03 ± 0.00

a3,4 dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC).