A lex naturalis delineates components of a human-specific, adrenal androgen-dependent, p53-mediated ‘kill switch’ tumor suppression mechanism

in Endocrine-Related Cancer

Correspondence should be addressed to J W Nyce: nyce.jonathan@acgt.us
Keywords:

The author and journal apologise for an omission in the above paper, which appeared in volume 27 part 2, pages R51–R65. The author wishes to provide a full definition of the variables given in the legend of Fig. 3 on page R55.

The amended legend to Fig. 3 is given in full below:

Figure 3
Figure 3

A normalized lex naturalis equation, representing a snapshot of a species with the dependent variables adult body size (S), lifespan (Li), species-specific mechanism of tumor suppression (T), and carcinogen exposure (E) in equilibrium to maintain lifetime cancer risk (R), at a value of about 4%. We have previously defined a singularity as the original transformed, tumor-competent cell, while it is still in its single cell state. T is the probability of successful extinction of singularities by a particular species-specific tumor suppression mechanism, and hence its value is represented as a reciprocal, 1/T. R is a measure of the probability of developing cancer at some time during the lifespan, and hence its value is also represented as a reciprocal, 1/R. These facts enable algebraic manipulation of the equation, e.g., Li = T/SER.

Citation: Endocrine-Related Cancer 27, 9; 10.1530/ERC-19-0382a

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    A normalized lex naturalis equation, representing a snapshot of a species with the dependent variables adult body size (S), lifespan (Li), species-specific mechanism of tumor suppression (T), and carcinogen exposure (E) in equilibrium to maintain lifetime cancer risk (R), at a value of about 4%. We have previously defined a singularity as the original transformed, tumor-competent cell, while it is still in its single cell state. T is the probability of successful extinction of singularities by a particular species-specific tumor suppression mechanism, and hence its value is represented as a reciprocal, 1/T. R is a measure of the probability of developing cancer at some time during the lifespan, and hence its value is also represented as a reciprocal, 1/R. These facts enable algebraic manipulation of the equation, e.g., Li = T/SER.